Procedures

Boating Safety - Procedures

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1. Purpose and Objectives

The purpose of these procedures is to ensure that the University meets its obligations under the Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012 (C'th) and the Transport Operations (Marine Pollution) Act 1995 (Qld).

2. Definitions, Terms, Acronyms

Crew - crew of a vessel means individuals employed or engaged in any capacity on board the vessel on the business of the vessel, other than the master of the vessel or a pilot.

Designated person - the person designated by the owner to be responsible for monitoring the safety and pollution prevention of the vessel and ensuring appropriate resources are provided to the vessel. For UQ owned vessels, the designated person would typically be the Vessel Custodian.

Domestic commercial vessel - domestic commercial vessel means a vessel that is for use in connection with a commercial, governmental or research activity operating in Australian territorial waters that is not owned by a primary or secondary school or a community group or not for profit sporting association. Vessels operating under the Navigation Act 2012 (C'th) are not domestic commercial vessels.

Master - the person who has command or charge of the vessel, but does not include a pilot.

Marine incident - marine incident means any of the following:

  • A death of, or injury to, a person associated with the operation or navigation of a domestic commercial vessel;
  • The loss or presumed loss of a domestic commercial vessel;
  • A collision of a domestic commercial vessel with another vessel;
  • A collision by a domestic commercial vessel with an object;
  • The grounding, sinking, flooding or capsizing of a domestic commercial vessel;
  • A fire on board a domestic commercial vessel;
  • A loss of stability of a domestic commercial vessel that affects the safety of the vessel;
  • The structural failure of a domestic commercial vessel;
  • A close quarters situation;
  • An event that results in, or could have resulted in:
    • The death of, or injury to, a person on board a domestic commercial vessel; or
    • The loss of a person from a domestic commercial vessel; or
    • A domestic commercial vessel becoming disabled and requiring assistance;
  • The fouling or damaging by a domestic commercial vessel of:
    • Any pipeline or submarine cable; or
    • Any aid to navigation within the meaning of the Navigation Act 2012 of the Commonwealth;
  • A prescribed incident, for example a notifiable incident under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Qld), involving a domestic commercial vessel.

Operate - determine or exercise control over the course or direction of the vessel or over the means of propulsion of the vessel, whether or not the vessel is underway; or load or unload the vessel when it is moored or berthed.

Owner - the owner of a vessel includes

  • a person who has a legal or beneficial interest in the vessel, other than a mortgagee; and
  • a person with overall general control and management of the vessel.

Further information pertaining to the meaning of owner under the National Law can be found in AMSA Guidance Notice 644.

Passenger - any person onboard who is not the master, crew or special personnel.

PFD1 - a personal floatation device (life jacket) compliant with the relevant National Standard for Commercial Vessels.

Sheltered waters - navigable waters defined by state or territory legislation as being smooth or partially smooth waters.

Significant alteration - the total mass of items added or removed is more than 4% of the displacement of the vessel before the alteration.

Special personnel - all persons who—

  • Have knowledge of safety procedures and handling of safety equipment on board;
  • Are not passengers, or members of the crew, or children under one year of age;
  • Are carried on board in connection with the special purpose of that vessel, or because of special work being carried out aboard that vessel; and
  • Are able bodied.

Vessel - a craft for use, or that is capable of being used, in navigation by water, however propelled or moved, and includes an air-cushion vehicle, a barge, a lighter, a submersible, a ferry in chains and a wing-in-ground effect craft but does not include aircraft.

Vessel Custodian - Faculty/School/Org Unit authorised officer responsible for the vessel or for hiring the vessel.

3. Procedures Scope/Coverage

These procedures apply to all staff, students, visitors and volunteers engaged as crew or special personnel on domestic commercial vessels in fieldwork, research, teaching, learning, instruction or other work at off campus locations which may/may not be registered as University workplaces, and where the University is responsible for the safety of its workers and those exposed to their activities.

4. Procedures Statement

The University boating safety procedure has been developed by the OHS Division in consultation with relevant University organisational units and sections. The objectives of these procedures are to:

  • Outline responsibilities of senior officers, supervisors, staff and students for planning and undertaking boating activities.
  • Provide information regarding domestic commercial vessels and their safe operation.
  • Provide instruction for maintaining records for domestic commercial vessel.

The broad aim of these procedures is to assist in safe operation of domestic commercial vessels.

These procedures in no way replace or contradict the provisions, responsibilities and requirements of the Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012 (C'th), the Transport Operations (Marine Pollution) Act 1995 (Qld) and the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Qld).

The material used in these procedures was derived from:

  • Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012 (C'th)
  • Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Regulations 2012 (C'th)
  • Marine Orders
  • National Standards for Commercial Vessels
  • Transport Operations (Marine Pollution) Act 1995 (Qld)
  • Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Qld)

5. Responsibilities

5.1 Executive Deans and Senior Managers

Executive Deans and Senior Managers must ensure the implementation and maintenance, within the faculty/institute/division, of an effective system of management for boating safety consistent with the Domestic Commercial Vessel National Law Act 2012 (C'th), Transport Operations (Marine Pollution) Act 1995 (Qld), Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Qld) and other legislative requirements.

Executive Deans and Senior Managers have additional responsibility as owners where vessels are owned by their organisational unit.

For further information regarding the duties of Executive Deans and Senior Managers see Staff Responsibilities for Occupational Health and Safety.

5.2 Heads of School and Organisational Units

Heads of School and Organisational Units must implement and maintain, within the School or Organisational Unit, an effective system of management for boating safety consistent with the Domestic Commercial Vessel National Law Act 2012 (C'th), Transport Operations (Marine Pollution) Act 1995 (Qld), Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Qld) and other legislative requirements.

Heads of School and Organisational Units must ensure that the boating operations undertaken by workers within their School or Organisational Unit comply with these procedures.

For further information regarding the duties of Heads of School and Senior Managers see Staff Responsibilities for Occupational Health and Safety.

5.3 Supervisors

Supervisors of workers conducting boating operations must undertake effective measures to ensure compliance with the Domestic Commercial Vessel National Law Act 2012 (C'th), Transport Operations (Marine Pollution) Act 1995 (Qld), Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Qld) and related legislative requirements.

Supervisors must ensure that boating operations are conducted according to these procedures.

Supervisors must ensure that boating operations are effectively supervised onsite, workers are adequately trained and experienced, risk assessments are completed, approved and relevant to the work being undertaken, and plant and equipment including PPE is provided and adequately maintained.

5.4 Workers

For the purposes of this Procedure, worker refers to any staff member, student, volunteer or visitor.

Workers must comply with requirements of the Domestic Commercial Vessel National Law Act 2012 (C'th), Transport Operations (Marine Pollution) Act 1995 (Qld), Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Qld) and related OHS procedures developed by the University, School or Organisational Unit.

Workers must ensure that they take reasonable care for their own and others' health and safety, comply with these procedures when participating in boating operations, and co-operate with any reasonable request with regard to these boating procedures.

A person embarking on, on board or disembarking from a domestic commercial vessel must take reasonable care for his or her own safety.

5.4.1 Master

The master of a domestic commercial vessel must, so far as reasonably practicable:

  • Ensure the safety of the vessel, its safety equipment and its operations; and
  • Implement and comply with the vessel's safety management system.

Duties of the master include:

  • Ensuring completion of the vessel's pre-departure checks;
  • Ensuring all crew and special personnel have completed the vessel induction;
  • Ensuring all crew and special personnel have completed emergency procedure training at the frequency stated in the vessel's safety management system;
  • Ensuring the vessel's records including the logbook are completed as per section 9 below;
  • Ensuring that any injury, illness or near miss is reported to the owner through UQ Safe - Incident; and
  • Ensuring that the designated person and the owner are notified of any marine incident or notifiable incident as soon as is practicable.

5.4.2 Crew

A crew member of a domestic commercial vessel must, so far as reasonably practicable:

  • Comply with any reasonable and lawful directions of the master of the vessel or a supervisor.

A member of the crew of a domestic commercial vessel must not interfere with or misuse anything provided on the vessel in the interests of the safety of the vessel.

Duties of crew members include:

  • Completing the vessel induction with the master or designated person;
  • Completing the vessel's emergency procedure training at the frequency stated in the vessel's safety management system.

5.4.3 Special Personnel

Special personnel of a domestic commercial vessel must, so far as reasonably practicable:

  • Comply with any reasonable and lawful directions of the master of the vessel or a supervisor.

Special personnel of a domestic commercial vessel must not interfere with or misuse anything provided on the vessel in the interests of the safety of the vessel.

Duties of special personnel include:

  • Completing the vessel induction with the master or designated person;
  • Completing the vessel's emergency procedure training at the frequency stated in the vessel's safety management system.

5.4.4 Designated person

The designated person for a domestic commercial vessel shall:

  • Monitor the vessel's operations and compliance with its safety management system, seaworthiness, and safety equipment and report any deficiencies to the owner.

5.4.5 Owner

An owner of a domestic commercial vessel must, so far as reasonably practicable, ensure the safety of:

  • The vessel; and
  • Marine safety equipment that relates to the vessel; and
  • The operation of the vessel.

An owner of a domestic commercial vessel shall;

  • Ensure the vessel has a current certificate of operation; and
  • Ensure the vessel has a current certificate of survey if required; and
  • Provide or maintain the vessel so that the vessel is, so far as reasonably practicable, safe; and
  • Implement and maintain a safety management system that ensures that the vessel and the operations of the vessel are, so far as reasonably practicable, safe; and
  • Provide, so far as reasonably practicable, such information, instruction, training or supervision to people on board the vessel as is necessary to ensure their safety.

5.4.6 Boating Officer

A Boating Officer shall:

  • Act as the designated person for any vessel in their custody.

6. Domestic Commercial Vessels

Any vessels used for research or educational activity wholly within the Australian economic exclusion zone is a domestic commercial vessel under the Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act (C'th) 2012 and must comply with all relevant requirements of the Act and related legislation.

Domestic commercial vessels used by UQ shall;

  • Have a current certificate of operation; and
  • Be operated as per its safety management system.

Vessel safety management systems shall comply with section 8 below.

6.1 Requirements for domestic commercial vessels that are engine powered

6.1.1 Certificate of operation

A current certificate of operation is required. The vessel shall be operated within the limits and conditions set by the vessel's certificate of operation.

Limits and conditions may include:

  • Area of operations;
  • Maximum number of persons to be carried;
  • Loading;
  • Weather and sea conditions not to be exceeded; and
  • Any exemptions that may apply.

6.1.2 Certificate of survey

A certificate of survey is required for any new vessel (built or commissioned after June 30th 2013) that is:

  • Greater than or equal to 7.5m in length; or
  • Carrying passengers; or
  • Operating beyond sheltered waters; or
  • Otherwise high risk.

Vessels requiring a certificate of survey must have an initial survey and periodic survey according to the schedule in National Standard for Administration of Marine Safety Survey of Vessels (NSAMS Section 4).

New vessels not in survey are required to comply with the National Standard for Domestic Commercial Vessels Part G.

6.1.3 National Standards for Commercial Vessels

New (built or commissioned after June 30th 2013) and existing domestic commercial vessels shall comply with all relevant sections of the National Standards for Commercial Vessels.

The National Standards include requirements for design and construction, fire safety, electrical, machinery and LPG systems,stability, required equipment including safety, communications, navigation and anchoring equipment, crew competencies and operations. Certificates of compliance are required for new vessels and for existing vessels that undergo significant alteration or repair. Where required, certificates of compliance are issued by accredited surveyors.

Provisions have been made so that vessels that were operating prior to June 30th 2013 can continue to operate under the standards to which they were built providing no significant change is made to their design, construction or operation (See Marine Order 504 s7 for detail).

6.2 Requirements for domestic commercial vessels that are human powered

Domestic commercial vessels that are human powered (eg kayaks, canoes) shall, as a minimum;

  • Carry a Level 50 PFD for each person in sheltered waters; or
  • Carry a Level 100 PFD for each person beyond sheltered waters; and
  • Carry a bilge pump or bailer unless the vessel is completely self-draining.

Human powered domestic commercial vessels are not required to have a certificate of operation or a certificate of survey.

7. Crewing

7.1 Factors determining appropriate crew

Factors to be considered when determining the appropriate crew include:

  • The tasks or activities of the vessel and any particular demands on the crew that each task or activity will impose in addition to the safe navigation of the vessel;
  • The number of persons to be carried on the vessel;
  • The design characteristics of the vessel, including its general arrangements, machinery and equipment;
  • The competency required for the use of technological aids to safety fitted in addition to the mandatory requirements;
  • The area of operation of the vessel and expected conditions (eg weather,climate and water temperatures);
  • The duration of the voyage;
  • The potential fatigue of the master and crew members;
  • The requirements for the vessel’s emergency preparedness including the vessel’s emergency plan;
  • The state of repair of the vessel and its machinery and equipment;
  • The need for safe and timely evacuation of all people from the vessel in an emergency;
  • The risks to the environment and all persons who will be on or near the vessel;
  • The qualifications and competencies of crew, including circumstances where the master is the only crew member holding mandated engineering qualifications (dual certification);
  • The external support available to the vessel and its crew;
  • Key onboard operations and identified potential risks.

The appropriate crew for general operations and core complement (minimum crew) shall be stated in the vessel's safety management system.

For all UQ-owned vessels, the minimum appropriate crew and special personnel shall be two persons, unless the voyage is short (under 60 minutes), does not involve any task other than navigating and berthing or trailing the vessel, and is in sheltered waters in which case the core complement may be reduced to one if a risk assessment determines it is safe to do so.

A specific operation, for example diving operations, may require a crew larger than the minimum stated in the safety management system.

7.2 Minimum qualifications

7.2.1 Master

  • Hold either a current certificate of competency issued by AMSA for the vessel length, engines, and area of operation (see NSCV Part D Schedule 2 for detail); OR hold a valid recreational marine driver's licence if the vessel is operating under AMSA exemption 15; and
  • Hold a current first aid and CPR qualification; and
  • Hold a valid certificate of proficiency for the vessel's marine radio equipment if marine radio equipment is fitted.

7.2.2 Crew

  • Hold either a current certificate of competency issued by AMSA as a General Purpose Hand or higher; OR hold a valid recreational marine driver's licence if the vessel is operating under AMSA exemption 15; and
  • Hold a current first aid and CPR qualification.

7.2.3 Special personnel

  • Have knowledge of safety procedures and handling of safety equipment on board.

7.3 Operations under Exemption 15

Where the vessel is being operated under exemption 15, the master of the ship must comply with section 7.2.1 above.

The minimum appropriate crew may be one master, and one special personnel.

Carriage of passengers is not permitted in any circumstance other than an emergency.

8. Risk Management

8.1 Vessel safety management system

Information regarding the requirements for a safety management system can be found in the National Standard for Domestic Commercial Vessels Part E.

Supervisors shall ensure that risk assessments for any planned activity utilising a domestic commercial vessel are completed in consultation with the vessel's owner and master. The designated person may act for the owner for the purposes of risk management consultation. Risk assessments for the planned activity shall be available on the vessel.

Vessel masters shall ensure that crew and special personnel have completed any relevant training in the timeframe required by the safety management system.

8.1.1 Voyage procedures

For UQ owned or operated vessels; the voyage procedures shall consist of;

  • A Work off-campus plan as per PPL 2.30.09 Work Off-Campus Safety unless the operation is solely on a UQ campus (eg work on the St Lucia lakes).
  • Complete the risk management procedures for the work being undertaken as per PPL 2.30.01 Occupational Health and Safety Management. Copies of any relevant risk assessments should be available on the vessel.
  • Pre-departure checks including checks of the safety gear.
  • Safety briefing given to all persons onboard.
  • Voyage details lodged with an appropriate shore party or as per the communication plan contained within the Off-campus work plan (eg research station, volunteer marine rescue, Coast Guard or other person).
  • Conduct voyage as per the vessel's operational requirements including:
    • Conduct any required emergency training;
    • Complete the vessel's log;
    • Complete any other records as required.
  • Log off with shore party on safe return to shore.

8.2 Conditions for mandatory wearing of life jackets

Life jackets (PFD1 or greater level of protection) shall be worn by all persons on open decked domestic commercial vessels where:

  • The sea state is over 25% of the measured length of the vessel; or
  • The average wind speed exceeds 20 knots or Beaufort force 6; or
  • Where indicated by the risk assessment.

9 Record Keeping

9.1 Crew

9.1.1 Crew details

The crew list, as required under the duties of the master, must include details of about the following:

  • The name of the vessel;
  • The identification number of the vessel;
  • The name, address, phone number and email address (if any) of the owner of the vessel;
  • The name, address, phone number and email address (if any) of the employer of the crew;
  • The name, home address, phone number and email address (if any) of each crew member;
  • The name, address and phone number of each crew member’s next of kin;
  • The capacity in which each crew member is employed;
  • Each certificate of competency or other certificate held by a crew member that is required by a standard prescribed under Marine Order 505 (Certificates of competency — national law) 2013;
  • The date each crew member joined the vessel;
  • The date each crew member left the vessel.

9.1.2 Training

A written record of the following matters must be kept about any safety training undertaken by crew members, including:

  • The date of the training;
  • The name of each participant;
  • The nature of the training (eg initial safety training, training in emergency procedures);
  • The location of the training.

9.2 Logbook

The vessel's logbook shall include details of:

  • Any illness or injury of persons onboard;
  • Any marine incident, other incident or accident involving the vessel or its equipment;
  • Any assistance rendered to another vessel;
  • Any unusual occurrence or incident;
  • All communications messages sent or received for an emergency;
  • Each inspection of the vessel, its machinery and its equipment that is required for maintaining the vessel.

Entries in the logbook must be made as soon as is practicable after the event occurs.

The vessel's logbook may contain:

  • Any details the master considers relevant, for example:
    • key activities;
    • position;
    • navigation track;
    • a general summary of the weather it has experienced.

Entries in logbooks must be maintained for five years.

10. Further Information

Contact the Boating and Diving Officer, OHS Division, for more information.

Custodians
Director, Occupational Health and Safety
Mr Jim Carmichael

Guidelines

Boating Safety - Guidelines

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1. Purpose and Objectives

The purpose of these guidelines is to provide guidance information for the safe use of commercial vessels.

2. Definitions, Terms, Acronyms

Crew - crew of a vessel means individuals employed or engaged in any capacity on board the vessel in the business of the vessel, other than the master of the vessel or a pilot.

Domestic commercial vessel - domestic commercial vessel means a vessel that is for use in connection with a commercial, governmental or research activity operating in Australian territorial waters that is not owned by a primary or secondary school or a community group or not-for-profit sporting association. Vessels operating under the Navigation Act 2012 (C'th) are not domestic commercial vessels.

Master - the person who has command or charge of the vessel, but does not include a pilot.

Marine incident - marine incident means any of the following:

  • A death of, or injury to, a person associated with the operation or navigation of a domestic commercial vessel;
  • The loss or presumed loss of a domestic commercial vessel;
  • A collision of a domestic commercial vessel with another vessel;
  • A collision by a domestic commercial vessel with an object;
  • The grounding, sinking, flooding or capsizing of a domestic commercial vessel;
  • A fire on board a domestic commercial vessel;
  • A loss of stability of a domestic commercial vessel that affects the safety of the vessel;
  • The structural failure of a domestic commercial vessel;
  • A close quarters situation;
  • An event that results in, or could have resulted in:
    • The death of, or injury to, a person on board a domestic commercial vessel; or
    • The loss of a person from a domestic commercial vessel; or
    • A domestic commercial vessel becoming disabled and requiring assistance;
  • The fouling or damaging by a domestic commercial vessel of:
    • Any pipeline or submarine cable; or
    • Any aid to navigation within the meaning of the Navigation Act 2012 of the Commonwealth;
  • A prescribed incident involving a domestic commercial vessel.

Operate - determine or exercise control over the course or direction of the vessel or over the means of propulsion of the vessel, whether or not the vessel is underway; or load or unload the vessel when it is moored or berthed.

Passenger - any person onboard who is not the master, crew or special personnel.

PFD1 - a personal floatation device (lifejacket) compliant with the relevant National Standard for Commercial Vessels.

Sheltered waters - navigable waters defined by state or territory legislation as smooth or partially smooth waters.

Significant alteration - the total mass of items added or removed is more than 4% of the displacement of the vessel before the alteration.

Special personnel - all persons who—

  • Have knowledge of safety guidelines and handling of safety equipment on board;
  • Are not passengers, or members of the crew, or children under one year of age;
  • Are carried on board in connection with the special purpose of that vessel, or because of special work being carried out aboard that vessel; and
  • Are able bodied.

Vessel - a craft for use, or that is capable of being used, in navigation by water, however propelled or moved, and includes an air-cushion vehicle, a barge, a lighter, a submersible, a ferry in chains and a wing-in-ground effect craft but does not include aircraft.

3. Guidelines Scope/Coverage

These guidelines apply to senior officers, supervisors, staff, students, visitors and volunteers engaged as crew or special personnel on vessels in fieldwork, research, teaching, learning, instruction or other work at off campus locations which may/may not be registered as University workplaces, and where the University is responsible for the safety of its workers and those exposed to their activities.

4. Guidelines Statement

The University boating safety guidelines have been developed by the OHS Division in consultation with relevant University organisational units and sections. The objectives of these guidelines are to:

  • Provide further information regarding risk management on domestic commercial vessels; and
  • Provide guidance for risk management for boating operations where the Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012 (C'th) does not apply.

The broad aim of these guidelines is to assist in safe operation of commercial vessels.

These guidelines in no way replace or contradict the provisions, responsibilities and requirements of the Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012 (C'th), the Transport Operations (Marine Pollution) Act 1995 (Qld) and the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Qld)

The material used in these guidelines was derived from:

  • Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012 (C'th);
  • Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Regulations 2012 (C'th);
  • Marine Orders;
  • National Standards for Commercial Vessels;
  • Transport Operations (Marine Pollution) Act 1995 (Qld); and
  • Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Qld)

5. Risk Management

5.1 Selection of vessel

The intent of good vessel selection is to minimise risk, maximise productivity and ensure that persons are able to return safely. Vessel safety standards can vary substantially, especially internationally.

When utilising a vessel for research or educational purpose, supervisors should consider the suitability of the vessel for their requirements, the area of operation, the likely sea conditions to be encountered, the likely state of the vessel repair and emergency equipment, and whether the communications systems are likely to be effective in the area of operations.

5.2 Operations

5.2.1 Bar crossings

Crossing coastal bars is inherently risky and should only be attempted by experienced masters. Local knowledge pertaining to the bar should be obtained wherever practicable. Sources of local knowledge include local marine authorities, other commercial operators and volunteer marine rescue organisations.

Large swell conditions and ebb tides may contribute to more dangerous conditions on the bar.

In general, the master should:

  • In open boats ensure all persons are wearing lifejackets or PFD1s;
  • Ensure all items and lines are secure;
  • Remind persons including crew regarding secure hand holds;
  • Ensure freeing ports are clear;
  • Log in with a shore contact immediately before and after crossing the bar.

Masters unfamiliar with a bar should gain experience with a master who is familiar with the bar.

Local legislation (eg NSW) may require additional qualifications for carriage of passengers across recognised coastal bars.

5.2.2 Night operations

Navigation of vessels at night requires local knowledge of local waters and navigational aids. Routes should be planned ahead of the voyage taking into account the likely sea conditions, water depth, and other vessel traffic. Speed may need to be reduced during night operations.

Supervisors should ensure that the master is suitably qualified and experienced prior to any planned operation occurring between sunset and sunrise.

5.2.3 Diving operations

Refer to PPL 2.30.08 Diving Safety for Procedures and Guidelines for diving operations.

5.2.4 Snorkelling operations

Refer to PPL 2.30.16 Snorkelling Safety for Procedures and Guidelines for snorkelling operations.

5.2.5 Hazardous manual tasks

Supervisors and masters should consider whether manual tasks on vessels require risk management as per the UQ Manual Tasks Risk Management Procedure.

5.2.6 Loading of vessels

Masters should ensure that vessels are loaded in such a manner as to not affect the vessel's stability. The master can ensure this by:

  • Not overloading the vessel as per its stated maximum load;
  • Ensuring loads are clear of freeing ports;
  • Ensuring loads are stable or secured for the sea conditions likely to be encountered (consider the effects of a other vessels as well);
  • Distributing the load fore and aft keeping in mind the desired trim of the vessel;
  • Distributing the load across the vessel so as to not create a substantial list in the vessel;
  • Not overloading any single point on the deck.

5.2.7 Footwear

Supervisors should consider the need for mandatory footwear when working on and around commercial vessels. Footwear will provide some level of protection to feet from protruding edges, rails, and bolts that often protrude around deck furnishings, and well as sharps such as broken glass and oyster shells often found in shallow water around boat ramps. Appropriate footwear will vary depending on the vessel and the work being undertaken. In most cases the footwear should provide stable support of the entire foot, enclose the toes and cover most of the foot, and provide grip on wet decks through an appropriate sole.

5.3 Frequency of emergency procedure practice

The maximum interval between emergency procedure practice for crews of UQ-owned vessels should be three months. A practice should consist of at least a 'dry-run' through the procedure.

5.4 First aid supplies

Guidance for first aid supplies required for domestic commercial vessels is provided by the National Standard for Commercial Vessels Part C7A. The owner and operator may amend the first aid supplies carried by a domestic commercial vessel to be higher or lower than the standard requires if the change is supported by a risk assessment of the vessel's operations, area of operations, and access to medical care onshore. For further information refer to General Equivalent Solution 2015/01 Carriage of First Aid Supplies on Domestic Commercial Vessels.

Custodians
Director, Occupational Health and Safety
Mr Jim Carmichael
Custodians
Director, Occupational Health and Safety
Mr Jim Carmichael