Procedures

Vaccinations and Immunisation - Procedures

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1.0                Purpose and Scope

This procedure supports the 2.10.03 Health, Safety and Wellness Policy Statement in protecting the health, safety and wellness of our people by minimising the risk of vaccine-preventable disease transmission occurring whilst working, volunteering, visiting or attending academic or research programs at the University of Queensland (UQ).

The application of this procedure is intended to reduce the risk not only for those within the scope of this procedure but also for the broader community affiliated with UQ.

This procedure outlines responsibilities for organisational units, supervisors and managers and provides instruction for those who, due to the nature of their activities at the University, may be at higher risk of exposure to vaccine-preventable disease (VPD).

This procedure should be read with reference to the associated UQ Guidelines 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisations.

2.0                Process and Key Controls

  1. UQ requires its workers and students to be appropriately immunised and/ or screened prior to commencing UQ work tasks or coursework that involves increased potential exposure to vaccine preventable disease (VPD). 

  2. Current and prospective workers and students are responsible for ensuring they receive the appropriate vaccinations or screening as identified for their work tasks or coursework.  UQ is responsible for ensuring that this occurs and must be prepared to demonstrate compliance to parties such as Queensland Health. 

  3. Immunisation records submitted by workers and students will be assessed for compliance relevant to the role or program and stored in university records. 

  4. Failure to comply with mandatory immunisation requirements may affect the worker or student’s ability to fulfil the inherent requirements of their position or coursework and disciplinary action may be taken against the worker or student.  For some roles and placements, proof of vaccination or evidence that an individual is not susceptible to specified VPDs is a condition of employment/engagement.

3.0                Key Requirements

3.1                 UQ workers, prospective workers and students

Immunisation requirements for UQ workers, prospective workers and students will be identified where there is an increased risk of acquisition or transmission of a VPD.  These persons must be provided with appropriate information and training, and if required, referred for vaccination and/or screening to minimise the risk of disease transmission occurring in the workplace. Section 4 of the associated Guidelines 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisations includes the following occupation or program activities:

  • Healthcare work or placements in Queensland Health (QH) or other clinical facilities or have frequent contact with clients who:

    • are immune compromised;

    • have a chronic health condition;

    • are pregnant;

    • are pre-school age; or

    • are elderly.

  • Early childhood education and care;

  • Laboratory or other activities involving human blood, body fluids or tissue;

  • Laboratory activities involving transmissible human or zoonotic pathogens;

  • Interaction with waste water or sewerage;

  • Contact with animals, animal blood, tissues, products or animal waste;

  • Contact with bats or ABL virus;

  • Interaction with pigs or poultry;

  • First aid;

  • Healthcare provision in remote Indigenous communities; and

  • Work related travel or field work activities.

Workers, prospective workers and students with identified exposure to any VPD must provide evidence of relevant work or coursework vaccination and screening requirements prior to exposure.

The University must ensure compliance with QH vaccination and screening requirements as per the QH Vaccination of Healthcare Workers Guideline and the QH Service Directive 047, Vaccine Preventable Disease Screening for Contractors, Students and Volunteers (2016)'

Staff, prospective staff and students interacting in healthcare facilities must provide evidence of relevant vaccination and screening by submitting the relevant university immunisation record forms available from the forms section of this procedure.  These forms must be completed by a Medical Practitioner before submission.

3.2                 Failure to Comply

The advice in this procedure is intended to protect the UQ community and also patients within healthcare facilities and clinics associated with UQ. Failure to comply with relevant immunisation compliance requirements can lead to an increased risk of serious illness occurring and will therefore result in students or workers being denied placements or being unable to undertake tasks that place them or others at risk of VPD transmission.

3.2.1              Workers

For UQ workers, non-compliance with immunisation requirements or an inability to comply due to health reasons may impact the ability to fulfil the requirements of the employment or placement position. In these circumstances supervisors should contact their local HR Officer for further advice.

3.2.2              Students

For some students, including HDR students, failure to comply or an inability to comply due to health reasons, may result in a situation where the student is unable to complete the practical requirements of their degree or higher degree program. Further advice can be obtained by contacting the relevant faculty or school.

3.3                 Costs

3.3.1              UQ staff and HDR Students

Prospective UQ staff are responsible for costs of vaccination and immunisation screening requirements if specified as a pre-employment or pre-placement requirement as outlined in the letter of offer.

For existing staff and HDR Students, the relevant Faculty, School or Centre is responsible for resourcing vaccinations and pathology tests (e.g. for proof of immunity) if required to prevent work-related transmission of VPD or are for work-related placements or travel.

3.3.2              Undergraduate Students 

Costs for course related vaccinations and immunisation screening for undergraduate students, are usually at individual expense.

3.3.3              Other workers (non-paid staff and contractors) 

Costs for work related vaccinations and immunisation screening for volunteers and other workers who are not employed by the University, but are required to comply with this procedure, are usually not covered by the University.

4.0                Roles, Responsibilities and Accountabilities

4.1                 Organisational unit - authorised recruitment officer

  1. Obtain advice from the new worker’s supervisor, safety officer/manager, or academic principal advisors to identify roles where pre-employment immunisation requirements will need to be considered during recruitment. 

  2. Obtain further information from section 4 of associated Guidelines 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisations or the UQ Occupational Health Nurse Advisor (OHNA). 

  3. Include immunisation requirements relevant to a position appointment in recruitment advertising, position descriptions and letters of offer as a condition of employment.

4.2                 Supervisors, managers and academic principal advisors

  1. Ensure that persons under their supervision, who may be at risk from VPD transmission due to the inherent requirements of work or research related tasks, are provided with adequate information and resources in relation to seeking appropriate vaccinations.  This includes contractors and other workers not employed by the University. 

  2. Refer to the UQ New Worker HSW Induction Checklist and section 4 of 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisation - Guidelines to identify roles where vaccination requirements will need to be considered.  Further advice can also be obtained by contacting the UQ Occupational Health Nurse Advisor (OHNA) or UQ Health Care.

  3. Inform the relevant authorised recruitment officer about specific immunisation requirements relevant to new position descriptions prior to the development of recruitment documents.

  4. Academic principal advisors developing proposals for HDR projects must consider as part of the project development, whether the prospective HDR candidates will be subject to specific immunisation requirements relevant to the position or project.

  5. Supervisors, managers and academic principal advisors are responsible for continually reviewing immunisation requirements and conducting risk assessments for their staff/students if and when the nature of work or research tasks is subject to change.

  6. Specific local site induction must be provided to contracted workers prior to entering a workplace where a risk of infectious disease transmission exists (E.g. in laboratories where biological pathogen research is conducted or in UQ Veterinary clinics where there may be a risk of zoonotic disease transmission).

4.3                 Health Safety and Wellness Division

  1. UQ Health Safety and Wellness (HSW) Division provides overall direction, advice and leadership to the University on occupational health and safety matters including relevant vaccination and screening requirements to minimise the likelihood of VPD exposure and transmission occurring in the workplace.

  2. Local safety co-ordinators are responsible for communicating information about transmissible disease hazards relevant to their workplace and for promoting and facilitating cooperation between workers, students and management in the implementation of this procedure and associated guideline.

4.4                 Workers, prospective workers and students

  1. It is advisable that UQ workers, prospective workers and students have completed the National Immunisation Program Schedule as recommended by the Federal Department of Health and in accordance with periodic updates.

  2. UQ workers, prospective workers and students should also refer to section 4 of the associated Guidelines 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisations to assist in identifying appropriate occupational or coursework immunisation requirements. 

  3. UQ workers, prospective workers and students must comply with safe working procedures including infection control measures to protect themselves and others in the workplace.  This can be achieved by the following means:

    1. Complying with pre-employment, pre-enrolment, placement, work role or specific project immunisation requirements.

    2. Seeking advice from the relevant Faculty, School or Centre Safety Co-Ordinator or Manager; UQ Occupational Health Nurse Advisor (OHNA) or UQ Healthcare. 

    3. Preparing or referring to a risk assessment or Standard Operating Procedure prior to commencing activities involving biological material.

    4. Seeking advice about working with high risk biological material from the UQ Biosafety Advisor or UQ Institutional Biosafety Committee.Seeking advice for work-related travel from UQ Health Care or from a specialist travel clinic.

  4. Workers or students involved in School of Veterinary Science or other animal related programs must refer to the immunisation requirements for their program or work role and section 4 of the associated Guidelines 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisations. E.g. Q-fever.

  5. Workers or students who are exposed to human blood or body fluids in the course of their work or study are required by the University to be adequately immunised against hepatitis B and provide proof of immunity or a Statement of Susceptibility. Please refer to section 4 and 5 of the associated Guidelines 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisations.

  6. Healthcare workers, other workers or healthcare students who interact in Queensland Health or other clinical facilities are subject to risk assessment. Refer to Queensland Health Vaccination of Healthcare Workers Guideline, section 4 of the associated Guidelines 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisations  and the forms section of this procedure to access the relevant worker or student immunisation record form.

  7. Healthcare workers or students who undertake 'exposure prone procedures' (EPP) as a requirement of their work or admitted program must also submit an EPP Declaration (signed by a medical practitioner) in relation to blood borne virus screening - see section 4 of the associated Guidelines 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisations.

  8. Healthcare workers, other workers and healthcare students interacting in clinical areas of Queensland Health facilities or other health facilities must also be assessed for their risk of developing tuberculosis and becoming infectious in the future (i.e. screening for latent tuberculosis) - see section 5 of the associated Guidelines 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisations.

4.4.1              Prospective UQ workers

  1. Prospective UQ workers must submit evidence of vaccination and immunisation screening according to the requirements of the role as requested in recruitment advertising, position descriptions and letters of offer. They should also refer to the UQ New Worker HSW induction checklist.

4.4.2              HDR students

  1. Immunisation requirements must be considered in risk assessments specific to on-going academic or research projects during the program. Evidence of relevant immunisation must be submitted before exposure to risk.  For example – prior to starting work with human blood or working on a research project with Japanese encephalitis virus. 

  2. HDR students interacting in clinical facilities must provide evidence to the University that they are adequately immunised prior to placements commencing by submitting the 'Healthcare Worker-Infectious Disease Screening and Vaccination Record' which is located at the forms section of this procedure. The form must be completed and signed by their medical practitioner. 

4.4.3              Undergraduate students

  1. Prospective students must comply with pre-enrolment vaccination and screening requirements as a condition of entry to their particular academic program.

4.4.4              Residential students

  1. Students living in residential colleges are particularly vulnerable to transmission of certain vaccine preventable diseases if they remain unvaccinated. All residential college students must refer to their college admission requirements.

  2. Students can also refer to section 3.2.1 of the associated Guidelines 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisation.

5.0                Monitoring, Review and Assurance

The relevant organisational unit must ensure a reliable immunisation compliance monitoring system is in place for students and workers. For some programs, vaccinations and screening requirements need to be periodically repeated therefore immunisation compliance monitoring systems must include a recall/reminder tool to ensure on-going compliance with this procedure.

6.0                Recording and Reporting

Information collected by the University in relation to immunisation requirements is for the primary purpose of protecting workers and students from the risk of VPD exposure or transmission due to the inherent requirements of their work, study or research activities. The information provided may be disclosed to Queensland Health or other placement organisations where the disclosure is authorised or required by law.  For further information please consult the UQ Privacy Management Policy at: http://ppl.app.uq.edu.au/content/1.60.02-privacy-management.

Immunisation records submitted by workers and students will be assessed for compliance relevant to the role or program and stored in university records.   Workers or students failing to comply with immunisation requirements or who have incomplete immunisation records, relevant to their role will be notified of outstanding immunisation compliance requirements.

Student and worker immunisation records will be retained by the University for a period of twenty-five years after the student or worker has left the University.

7.0                Appendix

7.1                 Definitions, terms, acronyms

HCW- Healthcare worker - person who provides care to patients in a hospital, health service or community care setting.

HDR – Higher Degree by Research.

HR - Human Resources.

Immunisation - the process whereby a person is made immune or resistant to an infectious disease, typically by the administration of a vaccine.

QH - Queensland Health.

Student - a student enrolled in the University and includes undergraduate, post graduate and HDR.

Statement of Susceptibility - letter from a medical officer, infection control practitioner or vaccine service provider stating that an individual is not susceptible to a specific disease.

Undergraduate Student - student enrolled in undergraduate academic programs at the university.

UQ Worker - For the purposes of this procedure, this includes:  

UQ Worker (staff) - includes all continuing, research (contingent funded), fixed term and casual staff employees as well as apprentices and trainees; and

UQ Worker (non-paid) - includes HDR candidates, sabbatical/visiting academics/researchers, vacation scholars, volunteers and students on work experience. 

Vaccination - the administration of a vaccine; if vaccination is successful, it results in immunity.

VPD - Vaccine preventable disease.

7.2                 References and resources

Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare (2010) National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)

http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/_files_nhmrc/publications/attachments/cd33_infection_control_healthcare.pdf

NHMRC.

The Australian Immunisation Handbook, 10th Edition. Canberra: National Health and Medical Research Council, 2013.

http://www.immunise.health.gov.au/internet/immunise/publishing.nsf/Content/Handbook10-home

Qld Government Centre for Healthcare Related Infection Surveillance and Prevention

http://www.health.qld.gov.au/chrisp/default.asp

Qld Health Guideline: Vaccination of Health Care Workers

http://www.health.qld.gov.au/qhpolicy/docs/gdl/qh-gdl-321-9.pdf

Custodians
Director, Health, Safety and Wellness Mr Jim Carmichael

Guidelines

Vaccinations and Immunisation - Guidelines

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1.0 Purpose and Scope

This guideline applies to all workers (staff and non-paid), contractors and students who are undertaking work, research or academic studies at the University of Queensland (UQ).

The information provided in this guideline is intended to assist UQ workers and students meet the requirements outlined in the associated UQ Procedures 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisations. It provides information about general vaccination recommendations in accordance with the Australian Immunisation Handbook and guidance for individuals and workgroups who due to the nature of their activities at the University are at higher risk of exposure to a vaccine-preventable disease.

This guideline is intended to protect not only UQ workers, contractors and students but also the broader community. 

2.0 Key Requirements

UQ seeks to minimise the risk, as far as is practicable, of persons being exposed to a vaccine-preventable disease (VPD). Where an increased risk at the University is identified, appropriate training, information and resources must be provided to achieve effective infection control. This provision extends to appropriate vaccination and immunisation screening recommendations.

The information provided in this guideline does not replace the need for individual medical consultation. Those working in specialised settings such as certain microbiological laboratories or infectious disease wards or those who are required to travel overseas to work should seek additional medical advice.

UQ workers and students who are pregnant or who have a serious illness or compromised immunity should also seek further medical advice.

Additionally, all persons with a known infectious disease have a duty of care to minimise the risk of transmission, as much as possible, to other members of the University community and the general public.

3.0 Roles, Responsibilities and Accountabilities

UQ workers and students

All UQ workers and students are advised to have completed the current Australian National Immunisation Program Schedule as recommended by the Australian Government Department of Health.

Workers and students who are moving to Australia from overseas are advised to seek medical advice prior to departure and bring relevant medical documentation with them.  On arrival it is advisable to also check with their Australian health care provider whether the vaccination schedule for their home country is equivalent to the Australian National Immunisation program schedule, as additional vaccinations may be required.

3.1  UQ workers

Specific vaccinations may also be required for those workers who are potentially at risk of exposure to VPD due to the inherent requirements of work tasks at the University.  Refer to section 4 of this guideline.

Prospective workers applying for healthcare related positions involving the risk criteria specified in section 4.1 of this guideline must comply with the pre-employment immunisation and screening requirements for their position. Please refer to the forms section of this guideline to locate – UQ Staff Healthcare Worker Form.

3.2                 UQ students

UQ students who undertake overseas placements must seek additional medical advice related to immunisation recommendations for the country they will be visiting.

Prospective students must refer to the enrolment information for their particular academic program to confirm whether immunisation requirements apply as a condition of entry onto the program. Specific vaccinations are required for students who are potentially at risk of exposure to VPDs due to the inherent requirements of course studies at the University - for further detail refer to section 4.4 of the Procedures 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisations and section 4 of this guideline.

Prospective Students enrolling in Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Health and Behavioural Science programs must comply with the pre-placement immunisation and screening requirements for their clinical placements.

Some students may need to undertake additional vaccination or screening due to overseas placement requirements during their program e.g. medical students enrolled on the Ochsner Clinical School program.

Please refer to program entry requirements and the relevant Student Immunisation Records Form available from the faculty website and the forms section of this guideline.

3.3                 Residential students

Residential students are strongly advised to review and update their vaccination status as advised above and particularly due to the fact that they are living in close quarters with others.

Vaccination against meningococcal disease is particularly recommended for adolescents and young adults.  Refer to section 5.6 of this guideline for information regarding the meningococcal ACWY and the meningococcal B vaccinations. 

Annual Influenza vaccination is also highly recommended for students living in residential accommodation.

It is prudent to also ensure immunity to varicella and measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) in persons born in 1966 or later and entering University as outbreaks may occur. Refer to section 5.5 and 5.12 of this guideline.

4.0 UQ work, research or placements

Some persons at the University are potentially at risk of exposure to VPD as a consequence of their workplace tasks, course placements or research activities. The exact nature of tasks or work location should be taken into account when deciding immunisation requirements to minimise the risk of VPD acquisition or transmission occurring. Those workers or students in the categories listed below must be provided with appropriate information and training and referred for relevant vaccination and/or immunisation screening before exposure to identified risk occurs.  

Note that there are special issues for those who are immune-compromised or pregnant in terms of exposure to pathogens or vaccines. General advice on these may be found in the NHMRC guidelines.  Specific medical advice relevant to their own situation should be sought by the worker or student.

For all vaccines, prescribing details should be consulted particularly for contraindications or warnings.

4.1                 Healthcare related roles and placements

Persons whose work or course program activities include tasks with risk of infectious disease transmission via direct or indirect contact with patients must provide evidence that they have been vaccinated against, or are not susceptible to the VPDs listed below:

  • measles;

  • mumps;

  • rubella;

  • varicella; and

  • pertussis (whooping cough).

 Risk criteria includes:

  • those who have regular face to face contact with hospital patients;

  • those who have regular face to face contact with; clients who are immune compromised, have been diagnosed with a chronic disease, are pregnant, pre-school age or elderly.

  • those whose normal work location or course placement is in a clinical area such as a hospital ward, emergency department, outpatient clinic, dental clinic or other clinical healthcare facility and includes non-clinical staff.

  • those whose work or course placement frequently or regularly requires attending a clinical area such as a hospital ward, emergency department, outpatient clinic, dental clinic or other clinical healthcare facility and includes non-clinical staff.

Refer to the forms section of this guideline and the Queensland Health Vaccination of Healthcare Workers Guideline

Tuberculosis screening for healthcare related roles and placements

It is a UQ requirement that those whose work or course program activities include the risk criteria above must also show evidence of screening for past tuberculosis exposure or latent infection.  The screening must be in the two years previous to employment or commencing student placements.  Refer to section 5.11 of this guideline.

Hepatitis B immunisation for healthcare related roles and placements

Persons who interact in clinical health facilities and have direct contact with patients or who may be exposed to human blood or body fluids as a result of their work or placement activities, must be vaccinated against hepatitis B.

Tasks that involve direct patient contact may include (not an exhaustive list):

  • providing clinical care or treatment of any kind;

  • assisting a patient to undertake activities of daily living such as eating, using the toilet or mobilising;

  • any manual handling of patients.

Other tasks with risk of hepatitis B exposure in healthcare settings include:

  • collecting, transporting, handling or processing of pathology samples;

  • cleaning of spills that may contain blood or body substances of any kind;

  • manual handling or transporting of deceased people;

  • post mortem examination or autopsies;

  • bed making and cleaning;

  • handling of soiled or contaminated linen;

  • handling of clinical or laboratory waste or waste receptacles;

  • cleaning in a patient room, using cleaning, repairing or maintaining equipment, surfaces or other items used in clinical areas or laboratory setting.

Refer to section 5.2 for further detail regarding hepatitis B vaccination. 

Exposure prone procedures (EPP)

An exposure-prone procedure (EPP) is a procedure where there is a risk of injury to the Health Care Worker (HCW) resulting in exposure of the patient’s open tissues to the blood of the worker. These procedures include those where the workers hands (whether gloved or not) may be in contact with sharp instruments, needle tips or sharp tissues (spicules of bone or teeth) inside a patient’s open body cavity, wound or confined anatomical space where the hands or fingertips may not be completely visible at all times.

ReferenceAustralian National Guidelines for the Management of Health Care Workers known to be infected with blood-borne viruses (2012).

Persons who undertake EPP as a requirement of their job or coursework must also submit an Exposure Prone Procedure Declaration signed by a Medical Practitioner prior to exposure. The Medical Practitioner must confirm that the person can safely perform EPP and has undertaken screening for Hepatitis B, C and HIV within the twelve months of their commencing employment or course program.

Dentistry students must repeat the screening and EPP declaration in the third and fifth year of their course. 

Prospective employees applying for Healthcare related positions at the University must comply with the pre-requisite immunisation requirements specified in the position description and letter of offer – Refer to section 3 of Procedures 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisations.  

All healthcare providers are strongly recommended to also be vaccinated against influenza on an annual basis.  Refer to section 5.3 of this guideline.

4.1.1 Healthcare providers – remote indigenous communities

Healthcare providers who work or are on placement in remote indigenous communities and/or regularly provide care for Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander children in the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia or Western Australia, must be immunised against hepatitis A in addition to the vaccines listed for all healthcare providers.  Refer to section 5.1 of this guideline. 

4.2 Childcare workers and students

UQ workers and students who currently work or intend to work with pre-school age children are recommended to be vaccinated against measles, mumps, rubella (if not immune), varicella (if not immune) and also pertussis (dTpa). Annual influenza vaccination is also strongly recommended.

4.2.1 Early childhood education and care

UQ workers and students who currently work or intend to work in early childhood education and care are recommended to be immunised against hepatitis A as well as those diseases listed in section 4.2 for Childcare workers and students.

4.3 Laboratory workers and students 

4.3.1 Human blood, body fluids or tissue

UQ workers and students who are directly involved with handling human tissue, blood or body fluids must be immunised against hepatitis B - see section 5.2 of this guideline.

4.3.2  Human or zoonotic infectious pathogens

Laboratory workers and students interacting with human or zoonotic infectious pathogens must refer to PPL procedure 2.40.02 Biosafety Requirements, as permission from The University of Queensland Institutional Biosafety Sub-Committee may be required prior to work commencing. A risk assessment for the pathogen involved must be undertaken to identify if a vaccination is available to protect against disease transmission in the workplace.

It is important to be vaccinated prior to work with the pathogen commencing and medical advice will be needed about the length of time needed before exposure to the pathogen in question. 

  • Persons handling veterinary specimens or working with Q fever organism (Coxiella burnetii) must undertake screening and if indicated, Q fever vaccination.  Refer to section 5.13 of this guideline.

  • Persons handling unscreened human tissue, blood or body fluids must be immunised against hepatitis B.  Refer to section 5.2 of this guideline.

  • Persons working with either bat tissues or lyssaviruses (including rabies virus and Australian bat lyssavirus) must be immunised against rabies.  Refer to section 5.9 of this guideline.

  • Persons working with Mycobacterium Tuberculosis must undertake baseline screening of their TB status prior to work commencing.  Refer to section 5.11 of this guideline. 

Vaccination against yellow fever, diphtheria, Japanese encephalitis and meningococcal disease is available if required from UQ Health Care located at St Lucia Campus, Gatton Campus, Ipswich or Woolloongabba. 

Further information about working safely with biohazardous material can be obtained from UQ Biosafety webpage. Pathogen Safety Sheets for some infectious micro-organisms can be obtained from:

4.4 Interacting with waste water, sewerage or soil

Persons frequently interacting with waste water or sewerage such as plumbers or those conducting waste water/sewerage research are recommended to be immunised against hepatitis A and tetanus - see sections 5.1 and 5.10.

4.4.1 Grounds workers and gardeners

Persons frequently handling manured soil should have received a complete childhood tetanus vaccination schedule (a 3 dose primary schedule as an infant and 2 booster doses at age 18 months and 4 years) and an additional booster dose as an adolescent. All adults who reach the age of 50 years without receiving a booster dose of tetanus in the last 10 years should receive a booster dose.

Persons whose last tetanus booster was more than 5 years and who have sustained a soil contaminated wound should seek a further booster dose from their GP at the time of injury. Refer to section 5.10 of this guideline.

4.5 Interacting with animals including animal blood, tissues, products or animal waste

UQ workers or students who work with agricultural animals or wildlife as outlined in 2.60.13 Q-Fever Screening and Immunisation must be screened and/or vaccinated against Q fever - also see section 5.13 of this guideline.

Veterinary workers and students are also recommended to receive annual influenza vaccination - see section 5.3 of this guideline.

Agricultural workers and those who work with animals should also be immunised against tetanus - see section 5.10 of this guideline.

Persons who work with bats or with animals in a rabies-endemic area must seek advice about rabies vaccinations.

4.5.1        Bats or Australian Bat Lyssavirus (ABL virus) 

Australian bat lyssavirus is a virus that can be transmitted from infected bats. Persons interacting with bats or ABL virus must be immunised against rabies and comply with recommended post vaccination and post exposure screening recommendations - Refer to section 5.9 of this document.

4.5.2 Pigs or poultry

Persons frequently in contact with pigs or poultry are strongly recommended to have annual influenza vaccination.  Refer to section 5.3 of this guideline.

4.6 First Aid Officers

First aid officers appointed for the University are recommended to be immunised against hepatitis B. Refer to section 5.2 of this guideline and PPL Guideline 2.60.10 Working Safely with Blood and Body Fluids.

4.7 Mortuary technicians and embalmers

Baseline screening for tuberculosis and immunisation against tetanus and hepatitis B is recommended for mortuary technicians and embalmers. For those likely to be exposed to faecal material as part of the embalming process, immunisation against hepatitis A is also recommended.

4.8 Work related travel or fieldwork activities

For all travel, particularly international travel seek specialised travel health advice and vaccinations and refer to information provided in the PPL 2.30.09 Work Off-Campus procedure and guideline. Travellers are also responsible for reading the travel advice issued by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade - Smart Traveller website.

Consider vaccination for Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV) for UQ workers or students who are living or working in the outer Torres Strait islands during the wet season.  Refer to The Australian Immunisation Handbook for guidelines.

5.0 Occupational Vaccinations and Immunisation Screening

5.1 Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is an acute infection of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus. The severity and duration of the infection varies however for most affected people the symptoms are self-limiting and usually resolve within 3 weeks. The symptoms are often more severe in adults compared to childhood cases and occasionally the symptoms of hepatitis A infection in adults can be seriously debilitating and last several months. Transmission of the virus usually occurs via faecal/oral transfer for example by drinking contaminated water, eating food that has been handled by an infected person or touching infected faeces from contaminated nappies or towels.

Vaccination must be considered for healthcare workers who live or work in rural and remote indigenous communities or who work in health units where the unit provides for substantial populations of indigenous children.

It is also recommended that childcare workers, carers of the intellectually disabled and for those who may be exposed to sewage at work, such as plumbers and persons conducting waste water/sewerage research are protected against hepatitis A transmission.

To avoid unnecessary vaccination, it is recommended that the following groups be screened for pre-existing natural immunity to hepatitis A:

  • those born before 1950;

  • those who spent their early childhood in endemic areas; and

  • those with an unexplained previous episode of hepatitis or jaundice. (N.B. Such a previous episode cannot be assumed to be hepatitis A).

If, upon screening, a person has total Hepatitis A antibodies or anti-HAV IgG, they are considered to be immune. It can be assumed that he/she has either had previous, perhaps unrecognised, HAV infection, or less likely, has been previously immunised. Hepatitis A vaccination in this instance would therefore not be required.

Hepatitis A vaccine is administered as two injections 6 to 12 months apart. A combined vaccine against hepatitis A and hepatitis B is available.

For further information about Hepatitis A, refer to Qld Health Conditions Directory and the Australian Immunisation Handbook.

5.2 Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a serious infection which causes inflammation of the liver. Hepatitis B is transmitted via parenteral exposure (see definition section 8.1) to the blood or body fluid of an infected person. Immunisation against hepatitis B is the most effective way of preventing infection transmission.

UQ requires hepatitis B vaccination and/or proof of immunity or a Statement of Susceptibility whenever there is a risk of persons acquiring or transmitting hepatitis B in the workplace e.g. healthcare staff, laboratory staff working with unscreened human blood or body fluids.

There is good evidence that a successfully completed primary course (three injections, the second at one month, the third at four to six months followed by a blood test with Hep Bs Ab >10 IU/l at least 4 weeks following last dose) provides long lasting protection in normal (immune-competent) individuals. If the primary course has produced a protective level of antibodies as detailed above, routine boosters are not recommended (Australian Immunisation Handbook). Further medical advice is necessary if vaccination is unsuccessful or if Hep Bs Ag, Hep B c Ab or Hep B DNA are positive. Refer to PPL Guideline 2.60.10 Working Safely with Blood and Body Fluids.

Hepatitis B vaccination and/or proof of immunity or a Statement of Susceptibility is required prior to commencing work or placement in a Queensland Health clinical facility. Please refer to Queensland Health Vaccination of Healthcare Workers Guideline.

For all UQ healthcare students, hepatitis B vaccination and/or proof of immunity or a Statement of Susceptibility is required prior to commencing a healthcare programs at UQ and/or clinical placements. Please refer to program entry requirements and also Queensland Health Vaccination of Health Care Workers Guideline.

A combined vaccine against Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B is available.

An approved rapid immunisation schedule is available for persons requiring urgent immunisation against Hepatitis B or Hepatitis A and B.

For further information about Hepatitis B, refer to Qld Health Conditions Directory and the Australian Immunisation Handbook.

5.3  Influenza

Influenza is a highly contagious disease caused by infection from Influenza type A or B (or rarely C) virus. These viruses infect the respiratory passages and lungs and can develop into a serious illness in some people, particularly those who are elderly, pregnant or have an underlying medical condition.

Annual vaccination with influenza vaccine in autumn is strongly recommended for those at personal or occupational risk from influenza, including the following:

  • All healthcare workers (HCW) and HCW students, to protect both the HCW and the patients they interact with.

  • Persons who work with children or care for persons with developmental disabilities. 

  • Persons who frequently interact with pigs and/or poultry.

  • Persons living in close quarters in residential accommodation such as student residential colleges.

Immune-compromised persons who receive influenza vaccine for the first time are recommended to receive two vaccine doses at least 4 weeks apart and one dose annually thereafter.

Influenza vaccination is available free of charge to staff during the annual UQ flu campaign in autumn each year. Students can access vaccination from their own GP or from UQ Health Care at St Lucia and Gatton campuses.

For further information about Influenza, refer to Qld Health Conditions Directory and the Australian Immunisation Handbook.

5.4 Japanese encephalitis

Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a serious infection of the brain caused by a mosquito transmitted virus. JE occurs mainly in Southeast Asia and China and occasional cases in eastern Indonesia and Torres Strait. There have been occasional outbreaks in Torres Strait and one case in North Queensland prior to the publication of this document. 

Vaccination is required for laboratory staff working with JE and is recommended for those who will be living or working on the outer islands of the Torres Strait for a cumulative total of 30 days or more during the wet season (December to May). Those visiting the outer islands in the dry season (June to November) do not require vaccination. Those visiting only the inner islands, including Thursday Island, do not require vaccination.

Workers and students intending to visit high risk areas such as rural parts of Papua New Guinea and Asia must consult with UQ Health Care (St Lucia Campus) or a travel medicine service or specialist for further advice. 

For further information about Japanese encephalitis refer to Qld Health Conditions Directory and the Australian Immunisation Handbook.

5.5  Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR)

For information about Measles, Mumps and Rubella infection refer to the Qld Health Conditions Directory.

All those in healthcare related roles and placements with direct or indirect patient contact must ensure they have received 2 doses of MMR vaccine or provide evidence that they are immune to these diseases.  This also applies to UQ staff or students who regularly interact as part of their UQ work or study  with persons who are immune compromised, have a chronic health condition,  are pregnant, pre-school age or elderly.

Residential students should have their vaccination records reviewed to ensure they have received 2 doses of MMR vaccine as MMR are highly contagious and can spread rapidly amongst persons living in close quarters. Although the incidence of these diseases has declined since the introduction of universal vaccination in the 1980's, there has been an increase in measles and mumps infections among adolescents and young adults who were not fully vaccinated against MMR.

Women should be screened for rubella antibodies shortly before every pregnancy, early in the pregnancy or if pregnancy is contemplated, irrespective of a previous positive rubella antibody result. Women should not receive the vaccine if they are pregnant or might become pregnant within 28 days. 

Persons born prior to 1966 are not required to be screened or vaccinated against MMR as persons in this age group are considered to have immunity (unless serological evidence indicates otherwise). MMR vaccination is contraindicated in those who are immune-compromised. Rubella containing vaccines are also contraindicated in pregnancy.

For further information about MMR refer to Qld Health Conditions Directory and the Australian Immunisation Handbook.

5.6 Meningococcal disease

Meningococcal disease is a severe illness that can cause death or profound life-long disability including brain damage, hearing loss and/or limb loss. It is an uncommon condition which occurs when meningococcal bacteria invade the body resulting in meningococcal meningitis or meningococcal septicaemia. Meningococcal bacteria are present in the throat or nasal passages of approximately 10% of the community. Most of these people are not affected by the presence of the bacteria and remain well but can transmit the bacteria to others. A small percentage of those infected may subsequently develop illness and will require urgent medical attention and treatment with antibiotics.

5.6.1 Meningococcal disease caused by A, C, W, and Y serotypes

At the time of publication of this document free vaccination is available for 15-19 year olds as part of the Queensland government immunisation schedule.  The meningococcal ACWY Vaccination program was introduced in 2017 in response to increased notifications of meningococcal disease caused by meningococcal strains W and Y in Queensland and other Australian jurisdictions during 2016. The program targets 15 - 19 year olds, who have the highest rates of meningococcal carriage and it is recommended that unvaccinated students 19 years of age or younger consider being vaccinated. 

Immunisation against meningococcal ACWY is also now part of the infant immunisation schedule.

5.6.2 Meningococcal disease caused by B serotype

Meningococcal B vaccination is recommended in a 2-dose schedule for all adolescents aged 15 - 19 years due to their higher risk of serotype B meningococcal disease compared with other ages. Meningococcal B vaccination is particularly recommended for adolescents and young adults living in close quarters, such as military recruits and students living in residential accommodation. Vaccination is recommended prior to entry to such high risk settings or as soon as possible after entry. This vaccination is currently not covered by the National Immunisation Program and is therefore not without cost to the patient.

For further information about meningococcal disease refer to Qld Health Conditions Directory and the Australian Immunisation Handbook.

5.7 Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

Pertussis (Whooping Cough) is a highly contagious respiratory infection caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. It can cause a persistent cough in adolescents and adults and in babies the infection can be life-threatening.

Vaccination against pertussis is recommended for any adult who wishes to reduce the risk of infection for themselves and for any close contacts who may be vulnerable to an increased risk of poor health outcome if infected. It is recommended that adults who have previously been vaccinated as a child against pertussis, and who require a booster against diphtheria or tetanus, consider boosting their pertussis immunity using the dTpa vaccination. dTpa vaccination is strongly recommended for pregnant women and all adults who will be in close contact with babies and young children including those working in early childhood care or education with children <4 years of age.

All those in healthcare related roles and placements with direct or indirect patient contact must be immunised against pertussis and must receive a pertussis booster if more than 10 years have elapsed since their last dose. Persons interacting with persons who are immune compromised, have a chronic health condition or who are pregnant, pre-school age or elderly must also comply with the same standard of pertussis immunisation as described for healthcare workers.

Vaccinated healthcare workers and students who develop symptoms compatible with pertussis infection should still be investigated for pertussis and must be excluded from the workplace until a pertussis diagnosis is ruled out.

For further information about pertussis refer to Qld Health Conditions Directory and the Australian Immunisation Handbook.

5.8 Poliomyelitis (Polio)

Poliomyelitis is an infection caused by polioviruses. Most infections cause mild disease, however, the virus can affect the central nervous system and cause paralysis and permanent disability.

It is important to retain high vaccination rates against polio in Australia while the disease remains endemic in other parts of the world.

All adults are recommended to have completed a full course of poliomyelitis vaccination as part of the National Immunisation program (at 2, 4 and 6 months of age with a booster at 4 years of age). 

Further boosters are not required except for the following persons at special risk, such as:

  • travellers to areas or countries where poliomyelitis is epidemic or endemic or with recent cases including vaccine derived polio - see http://www.polioeradication.org for more information on affected countries, or

  • Healthcare workers, including laboratory workers, in possible contact with poliomyelitis cases.

For those exposed to a continuing risk of infection, booster doses are desirable every 10 years.

The risk of exposure to polio in the Australian community including the healthcare setting is considered too low to routinely recommend polio boosters to healthcare students. Polio vaccine (the inactivated polio vaccine by injection) is recommended for students who will be undertaking a period of training in countries where polio is present.

For further information about polio refer to Qld Health Conditions Directory and the Australian Immunisation Handbook.

5.9 Rabies/Australian bat lyssavirus (ABL)

Rabies is a disease of the nervous system caused by the rabies virus. Rabies infects domestic and wild mammals and is spread to humans through close contact with infected saliva, usually via an infected animal bite or scratch. Rabies in humans is almost always fatal once symptoms develop. Rabies is not found in Australia but a close relative of the virus called the Australian bat lyssavirus, can be found in Australian bats.

UQ veterinary and wildlife workers and students who handle Australian bats, or researchers who work with Australian Bat Lyssavirus (ABL) in a laboratory, or those who work with animals in areas of the world where rabies is endemic, must have completed a pre-exposure rabies vaccination course. Workers and students must seek rapid post exposure treatment in the event they are bitten or scratched or sustain a contaminated needle stick injury when handling a bat or other potentially infected animal. Please refer to PPL 2.60.14 Working Safely with Bats and Flying Foxes: Lyssa Virus for information about pre exposure vaccination, post exposure treatment and the requirement for on-going rabies boosters and rabies antibody monitoring. Also refer to the Work Health and Safety Queensland, Australian bat lyssavirus and handling bats for further information about safely handling bats.

5.9.1 Rabies/ABL screening

UQ workers and students likely to be exposed to bats in Australia or overseas or potentially rabid animals overseas, should have antibody levels checked or be re-vaccinated every 2 years. Those with impaired immunity should have their antibody levels tested 2-3 weeks after the third dose of the vaccine.

UQ Workers and students who work with ABL in a laboratory must have their antibody levels tested every 6 months and receive booster doses, if required, depending on the antibody level.

For further information about rabies refer to Qld Health Conditions Directory and the Australian Immunisation Handbook.

5.10 Tetanus

Tetanus is an acute disease caused by the bacteria Clostridium tetani. This bacteria is commonly found in soil, dust and manure. The bacteria can contaminate wounds and produce a toxin which causes painful muscular contractions and spasms. Unvaccinated persons are at risk of developing tetanus if they sustain a wound contaminated by tetanus bacteria.

All adults in the community, including all UQ workers and students, are advised to maintain their immunity to tetanus. Young adults who have received four doses in their first five years of life should have a further dose at the age of 10 - 17 years. Immunity following complete vaccination is long lasting. Maintenance of immunity with a routine booster at ten yearly intervals is no longer recommended. A booster at the age of 50 is recommended. Those who reach the age of 50 years without receiving a tetanus booster should seek a booster dose of dT - containing vaccine. Preferably, this should be given as dTpa to also provide protection against pertussis. An additional dose is needed in the case of serious or contaminated injury if more than 5 years have elapsed since the last dose.

Agricultural workers, veterinary workers and others at risk of sustaining penetrating injuries (i.e. an animal bite) or soil contaminated injuries, should be fully vaccinated against tetanus. The situation is not clearly defined for persons in these groups who receive minor tetanus-prone wounds frequently. They should seek medical advice about the need for and frequency of booster doses if they regularly sustain minor injuries in the course of their work. A combined vaccine is normally used which contains tetanus and diphtheria (ADT) and for those who require pertussis protection there is a combined diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis vaccine available.

For further information about tetanus refer to Qld Health Conditions Directory and the Australian Immunisation Handbook.

5.11 Tuberculosis screening

Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection that can affect almost any part of the body but most commonly infects the lungs (pulmonary tuberculosis). Please refer to QH Health Conditions Directory for more information about this condition.

At the start of employment or a study program with the University, persons who perform tasks that would allow acquisition and/or transmission of TB during their work or placement activities must undergo baseline screening for previous infection prior to work or placement activities commencing.

A Quantiferon Gold TB blood screening test, organised via a General Practitioner or a tuberculin skin test (TST) via the Queensland Health clinical TB screening service or a suitably accredited private pathology provider, must be undertaken for persons in the following categories:

  • Healthcare workers who perform tasks that would allow acquisition and/or transmission of TB during their work or placement activities - refer to UQ Healthcare Worker - infectious Disease Screening and Vaccination Record.

  • Healthcare students - refer to entry requirements for course program. 

  • Embalmers and workers involved in conducting autopsies.

  • Laboratory workers conducting research with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

Laboratory workers conducting on-going research tasks with Mycobacterium Tuberculosis must also undertake TB screening on an annual basis and a final screening test on exiting the project.  

Persons who have a positive TB screening test will be referred to the Specialised Health Services - Queensland Health for further follow up.

The BCG vaccine is no longer routinely recommended for TST negative healthcare workers. However BCG vaccination should be considered for TST negative healthcare workers at high risk of being exposed to drug-resistant TB.

Healthcare workers who may be at high risk of exposure to drug-resistant cases should consult Queensland Health Centre for Healthcare Related Infection Surveillance and Prevention for advice.

For further information, refer to Table C.21 of the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and control of Infection in Healthcare 2010  or contact the Division of Specialised Health Services - Queensland Health.

5.12 Varicella (Chickenpox)

Varicella is a highly contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus. In healthy children, the disease is usually a mild illness however life-threatening complications are known to occur. For most, the disease presents with mild cold-like symptoms with a rash appearing after 2 days. The rash has characteristic itchy blisters that last approximately 4-5 days. Varicella infection can however be much more severe in adults and can cause serious and have even fatal consequences for persons who are immune-compromised. Varicella can also have harmful consequences for an unborn baby therefore pregnant women and those with new-born infants should seek urgent medical advice if they have close contact with a person who has been diagnosed with varicella infection.

Varicella vaccination is mandatory for all non-immune healthcare related personnel (including students) and is particularly important if working in maternity, neonatal or paediatric wards, or with immune-compromised patients.

  • UQ Healthcare workers and Healthcare students must be vaccinated with 2 doses of varicella or provide evidence of varicella immunity.

  • A person is considered immune and does not require vaccination if a blood test shows varicella (IgG) antibodies.

  • Persons who are not immune to varicella must avoid contact with those with chicken pox or shingles infections.

  • Recently vaccinated healthcare workers (within the last 6 weeks) who develop a rash from the vaccine should not be in contact with susceptible patients for the duration of the rash.

  • Varicella is a live vaccine and is contraindicated in those who are immune compromised or pregnant. Pregnancy should also be avoided for at least 28 days post varicella vaccination.

  • For further information about varicella refer to Qld Health Conditions Directory and the Australian Immunisation Handbook.

5.13 Q fever

Q-Fever is a zoonotic infection transmitted by the bacterial microorganism Coxiella burnetii, usually via dust and aerosols from infected animals. Protection against Q-fever transmission is recommended for persons working with cattle, sheep, goats and some feral animals (and for those who frequently work in areas where these animals are kept). This also includes persons who are frequently exposed to products, materials or waste from these animals.  Workers and students considered to be at significant risk of infection transmission include those working in agricultural and farms, veterinarians and veterinary students, wildlife research and persons working in a laboratory setting with the organism Coxiella burnetii. Q-Fever screening must be undertaken prior to Q-Fever vaccination. Screening includes a serum antibody test and skin testing. Screening identifies those who should not be vaccinated to avoid side effects. Vaccination must be preceded by a negative blood and skin test performed by a specifically trained doctor. See the UQ Health Care website and UQ Q-Fever Guideline for details of the screening and vaccination program.

For further information about Q-Fever please refer to the QH Health Conditions Directory and the Australian Immunisation Handbook.

6.0 Documentation

Written documentation, such as an International Certificates of Vaccination booklet, should be kept of all immunisations. Apart from acting as an official record of immunisations for overseas travel, it is also designed to serve as a permanent record of routine and work/course related immunisations. Records of associated blood and other test results also should be retained.

Personal records should be kept indefinitely by the individual. 

Occupational immunisation records for workers and students should be retained by the University for a period of 25 years after the person has ceased work or study with the University.  Refer to section 6 of the associated UQ Procedures 2.60.08 Vaccinations and Immunisations.

7.0 Further advice and assistance

Clinical assistance and expert advice are available from UQ Health Care (St Lucia and Gatton Campus). Additional advice can be obtained from the Vaccination Compliance Nurse or the Occupational Health Nurse Adviser in the Health, Safety and Wellness Division, email: immunisation@uq.edu.au or OHNA@uq.edu.au or phone 3365 2365.

8.0 Appendix

8.1                 Definitions, terms, acronyms

Anti-HAV - serum antibody to hepatitis A virus.

ABL - Australian bat lyssavirus.

Bacteria - micro-organisms that can cause infection. 

BCG- Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine.

dT- Diphtheria, tetanus vaccine.

dTpa- Diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccine.

HCW- Healthcare worker - person who provides care to patients in a hospital, health service or community care setting.

HDR - Higher Degree by Research.

Hep Bs Ab - Hepatitis B surface antibodies.

IgG - immunoglobulin G, a group of antibodies that protect against a wide range of infecting organisms.

Immunisation - the process of inducing immunity to an infectious agent by administering a vaccine.

Immunity - the ability of the body to fight off certain infections; immunity can result from naturally acquired infection or from vaccination.

MMR Vaccine - Measles, Mumps, Rubella vaccine.

Parenteral - brought into the body via a route other than the digestive tract. 

Statement of Susceptibility - letter from a medical officer, infection control practitioner or vaccine service provider stating that an individual is not susceptible to a specific disease.

SOP - Safe Operating Procedure.

Student - a student enrolled at the university and includes undergraduate, post graduate and HDR.

Tetanus prone injury - Please refer to section 4.19.9 'Tetanus-prone wounds in the latest edition of the  Australian Immunisation Handbook.

TB - Tuberculosis - is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

TST - Tuberculin Skin Test (also known as Mantoux test).

UQ Worker - For the purposes of this guideline, this includes:

UQ Worker (staff) - includes all continuing, research (contingent funded), fixed term and casual employees as well as apprentices and trainees, and

UQ Worker (non-paid) - includes HDR candidates, sabbatical/visiting academics/researchers, vacation scholars, volunteers and students on work experience.

Vaccination - the administration of a vaccine; if vaccination is successful, it results in immunity.

Virus - a minute living organism smaller than bacteria that can cause infections.

VPD - Vaccine preventable disease.

8.2              References and resources

Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare (2010) National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)

http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/_files_nhmrc/publications/attachments/cd33_infection_control_healthcare.pdf

NHMRC.

The Australian Immunisation Handbook. Canberra: ATAGI and National Health and Medical Research Council, 2018.

https://immunisationhandbook.health.gov.au/ 

Australian National Guidelines for the Management of Health Care Workers known to be infected with blood-borne viruses. Australian Communicable Diseases Network 28 February 2012

http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/content/36D4D796D31081EBCA257BF0001DE6B7/$File/Guidelines-BBV-feb12.pdf

Qld Government Centre for Healthcare Related Infection Surveillance and Prevention

http://www.health.qld.gov.au/chrisp/default.asp

Qld Government health conditions directory. 

http://conditions.health.qld.gov.au/HealthCondition/Home

Qld Health Guideline: Vaccination of Health Care Workers

http://www.health.qld.gov.au/qhpolicy/docs/gdl/qh-gdl-321-9.pdf

Qld Health Fact Sheet: Hepatitis B Vaccination for Students

http://www.health.qld.gov.au/chrisp/resources/fs-student-HBV.pdf

Q-fever

http://www.immunise.health.gov.au/internet/immunise/publishing.nsf/Content/handbook10-4-15

Tetanus

https://ppl.app.uq.edu.au/content/2.60.10-working-safely-blood-and-body-fluids

Custodians
Director, Health, Safety and Wellness Mr Jim Carmichael

Forms

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Immunisation Referral - Form

Immunisation Referral - Form

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Description: 

Use this form for immunisation referral for work-related vaccinations for staff.

Custodians
Director, Health, Safety and Wellness Mr Jim Carmichael
Student Immunisation Records - Form

Student Immunisation Records - Form

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Description: 

The student immunisation record forms below are for students enrolled in programs which require them to undertake clinical placements in a hospital or health service. 

The forms must be completed by a registered medical practitioner and returned to the appropriate UQ school or faculty.

Custodians
Director, Health, Safety and Wellness Mr Jim Carmichael
UQ Staff Healthcare Worker - Form

UQ Staff Healthcare Worker - Form

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Description: 

Please ensure that all details on this form are completed and the relevant signatures have been obtained.  The completed form will need to be returned to the relevant HR Officer for your Faculty or School.

Custodians
Director, Health, Safety and Wellness Mr Jim Carmichael
Custodians
Director, Health, Safety and Wellness Mr Jim Carmichael
Custodians
Director, Health, Safety and Wellness Mr Jim Carmichael